The dark side of personal growth and transformation

I’ve always been a bit of a “personal growth junkie.” It’s what draws me to the work of coaching. And of course, I have a coach. He constantly invites me into a larger, more powerful version of myself. He challenges the ways I limit myself. Coaching helps me live more fully into my potential. All great, right?

That’s the light side of personal growth, the pretty part of the journey. It’s what makes coaching or workshops worth the investment of our time and money.

Leadership, Complexity and the Self

If you’ve been following my blog for the past year or so, you know that complexity and what it asks of us as leaders has been on my mind a lot. There is no arguing with the fact that these are complex times. It can be challenging to see clearly what is needed. Doug Silsbee has just released his new book, Presence-Based LeadershipIt’s an incredible resource for today’s leaders.

Your Bold and Beautiful Aspirations

What’s bigger than a BHAG and small enough to hide in your pocket? It’s those hidden dreams for what your organization can become and what you can do in the world. Not just your “stretch goals” or even your BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal). You’ve pushed yourself to write those down and used them to help your team achieve more. That’s fabulous. And, I’m betting there’s more. Your bold and beautiful aspirations.

Leadership for Imperatives for Complexity #5

As leaders, we often identify our role in terms of the results we are responsible for. And yet there is a second aspect of your role in complex situations that is just as important to focus on – creating the conditions that foster the emergence of your desired outcomes. Yeah, that’s a lot harder to get your arms around than the results. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t matter.

Leadership Imperatives for Complexity #4

Complexity is messy. When we encounter a messy problem, most of us tend to pay attention first to “the problem” as something separate from us. For example, if the quality of public education in my town has declined, I look at things like school financing, teacher preparation, curriculum, etc. I implicitly define the problem as “out there.” While those things surely deserve attention, I’ll be more effective in making changes if I also consider myself as part of the system and thus something that might be changed to shift the system.